Pacific Media Centre Pacific Media Watch Pacific Journalism Review Asia Pacific Report

self-censorship

One of the ironies of the digital revolution is that there is an illusion of growing freedom of expression and information in the world, when in fact the reverse is true. These are bleak times with growing numbers of journalists being murdered with...
This edition of Pacific Journalism Review is themed on the Media and Democracy in the South Pacific symposium held in Suva in September 2012. Hosted by the University of the South Pacific, the conference has provided most of the core papers for this...
Fiji is preparing for general elections in 2014 by when the country will have been under military rule for eight years. A process of constitution-making began in mid-2012 and a new Constitution should be available by 2013. Citizens and the media...
Commentary: After four military coups in 20 years, Fiji is poised to return to democracy in elections promised for 2014.  An emergency decree placing censors in newsrooms was lifted in January 2012, but with domestic media gagged by lawsuits and...
Commentary: While cartoonists at a ‘Cartoons for Peace’ conference generally claimed that freedom of expression was a byword in their respective newspapers, many, in the same breath, identified the cartoon work of others that they would not dare...
By and large, however, the press in democractic Asia is threated less by government action than by government inaction in the face of violent attacks against journalists. Seven Asian journalists were killed for their work in 2000, nearly all of them...
Several Pacific papers were presented at the inaugural World Association of Press Council's Oceania regional conference in Brisbane in June. The first was an overview of the region. 
Journalists feel the pressures to conform to the accepted values of their workplace. But those values come not just from editors and producers above them, but significantly from the journalists' peers—their fellow journalists.
Shortly after the Dili massacre in November 1991, I was paid a 'kill' fee by one of New Zealand's largest dailies rather than publish a detailed account of the circumstances leading up to the massacre and an exposure of the Indonesian lies and...
Commentary: The only crime committed by these journalists - 71 had been in prison for more than two years - was to have written something that their governments disliked.
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