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The News: Sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists have all focussed their critical faculties on journalism and the news, so it is not surprising, perhaps, that a philosopher might do the same. And with what relish does Alain de Botton aim...
When Rachel Buchanan penned a commissioned article entitled ‘From the classroom to the scrapheap’ for The Age last September, she railed against Australian journalism schools, in particular, against an alleged ‘lie’ and ‘little integrity’ of...
BOOK REVIEWS in the October 2013 edition of Pacific Journalism Review: INTRO: A Beginner’s Guide to Journalism in 21st-century Aotearoa/New Zealand Edited by Grant HannisReviewed by Louise Matthews     p235 The Great Adventure Ends: New Zealand...
The implications of the internet for journalism practice have been widely explored in journalism studies scholarship, and interest in new forms of digital journalism practice has outgrown interest in the analysis of traditional forms of news...
Over recent years in Australia we have seen a number of big stories emerge which highlight the difficult legal positions in which journalists too often find themselves. One of the biggest was Gina Rinehart’s attempts in Western Australia to have...
Fighting to Choose is a fascinating, meticulously researched history of the struggle to liberalise New Zealand’s abortion laws. It examines why there is still no right to have an abortion in a progressive country like New Zealand, which has a strong...
When the so-called ‘woman in red’ became a reluctant icon of a people’s revolt in Turkey in June, the state violence quickly targeted the news media. Ceyola Sungur, an academic at Istanbul’s Technical University, was projected into instant global...
BOOK REVIEWS in the October 2013 edition of Pacific Journalism Review: The Media in Transitional Democracies By Katrin Voltmer Rethinking Journalism: Trust and Participation in a Transformed News Landscape Edited by Chris Peters and Marcel...
On the night the The Hungry Tide was screened on Māori Television in New Zealand, our family was having a farewell party for our relatives returning to Kiribati the next day. We sat cross-legged on a mat in a circle while women prepared meals for...
New Zealand's war in Afghanistan is our longest-ever foreign engagement. Our troops have been there for 10 years—more than World Wars One and Two combined. It has cost the country around $300 million, and one soldier has died for every year the New...

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